What is In-Office Neurofeedback?

In-office Neurofeedback targets very slow brainwaves which only take place in our unconscious processes. This requires a highly skilled technician or clinician for precise electrode placement and protocol development. Unlike home Neurofeedback, in-office Neurofeedback doesn't require the client to consciously focus on the training or on learning a new skill. It all takes place "behind the scenes."

How does it work?

Devices are connected to the scalp with electrodes and measure (listen to) the brainwave activity. The signal is processed by a computer program, and information is gathered about the brainwave frequencies and responses to the feedback. Your brain is then given rewards and encouraged when it is operating more efficiently. Neurofeedback helps your brain function better and the effects are typically lasting due to your brain learning a new skill.

How do I get started?

Session 1: Consultation to ensure that this is a good fit

Session 2: Psychological testing/Continuous Performance Test

Session 3: Neurofeedback training begins

What is involved in the training process?

A client will receive training for 20-30 sessions depending on the level to which symptoms are reduced. Between sessions, 1-2 nights of sleep is recommended so that their brain can organize the new regulatory patterns it is forming in session. During the entire process, the client will be asked to keep track of symptoms through an email symptom tracker in order to keep track of progress.

What should I expect for the first session?

The first session involves a continuance performance test (which measures sustained attention and response time), full medical history, and a communication of what the client would like to work on through the sessions. The goal of this session is to set the groundwork for future sessions and give the technician information in order to develop an accurate and personalized protocol for each client.

Do you feel stuck and want to try Neurofeedback?

(360) 207-9218

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